How long does my employer have to pay me for unused sick time.

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How long does my employer have to pay me for unused sick time.

In my employee contract it states that I will be paid for any unused sick time and personal days that are not used by the end of the year. I have been asking my manager/company owner about when I would get paid and it took me until March to even get an initial response. I feel like she was giving me the run around and gave me some really vague answer about human resources and this and thatwe dont have a human resources department where I work. It has been two months since I spoke with her about it and I still have not received my pay or even an update. It is May now and I am wondering if there is a time limit on when they have to pay me. Thank you for your time.

Asked on May 8, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Washington

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Unless you have an employment contract or union/collective bargaining agreement that provides a deadline for making the payment, there is not set time for this. Based on the payout of other monies, this is still within what would be considered a reasonable period. (e.g. bonuses, etc.)

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, the law does not provide a time frame for this, so if the contact does not specify when they must pay, there is no no hard-and-fast timeline. They would simply need to pay within a "reasonable time"--however, since many end-of-year payments (like bonuses) aren't paid until April or May, they are probably still within what is considered reasonable for a payment like this.


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