How can we figure out why my husband is being garnished and how can we stop the garnishment due to our financial hardship?

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How can we figure out why my husband is being garnished and how can we stop the garnishment due to our financial hardship?

My husband claimed unemployment a year ago and now they are garnishing that money back from him. He now receives a military benefit called the GI Bill. He is currently not employed but is seeking a job. We just had a baby and are living off of less than $1000 a month for a family of 3. We can not afford for any of this money to be garnished. Given our circumstances is there any way to stop the garnishment? otherwise we stand to lose our apartment. Also we are trying to figure out exactly why they are taking back his unemployment money but we just keep getting the run around and no one seems to really know why but wont help us.

Asked on January 16, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Washington

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You need to get his credit report from all three credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Trans Union and Experian). Then, you order these for free once a year. Check your internet search and you will be able to find the correct web address to order these for free. Find the collection item on all three reports if it has been reported to all three. Once you find it, you can log in to that particular credit reporting agency with your credit report number and file a dispute online. Further, you should also contact unemployment anf find out. If this has been fruitless, you need to figure out if you qualify for the Soldiers and Sailors Relief Act. You need to talk to your state and federal politicians and file a complaint through their offices. Their field agents just might be able to help you, as well.


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