If I was hired at full-time atone pay rate, after working for almost a week can my pay rate and hours now be cut?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If I was hired at full-time atone pay rate, after working for almost a week can my pay rate and hours now be cut?

I recently was hired at a physical therapy rehab physicality. When hired I was told that I would be paid $15 an hour with full-time hours. After only 3 days of working, my boss now informs me that she can only pay me $12 an hour with minimal hours, such as 2-3 days a week. I quit my previous job and gave my 2 week notice because I wanted to peruse this. It seemed like, better opportunity. Currently I’m left with even less pay than before and struggling trying to support my family. Is there anything that can be done about my situation?

Asked on September 26, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Tennessee

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

1) If you have an employment contract guarantying you a certain rate, number of hours, etc., that contract is enforceable.

2) Even without a contract, you may have enforceable rights IF the employer knew or should have known you'd leave an existing job to take their offer. When someone makes a promise to you, which promise is designed or expected to get you to do something (like take a job), and the person knows or should know that to do what he wants, you'd have to do something to your detriment (like leave an existing job), and it is reasonable for you to do this and rely on the promise, then the courts often hold that the promise is enforcable, because of your detrimental reliance (under the theory of "promissory estoppel").

From what you write, it would seem worthwhile for you to consult with an employment attorney.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption