Found out the ex husband has been using the kids Social Security #s to work. The job is aware of it. What can be done to both him and the job?

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Found out the ex husband has been using the kids Social Security #s to work. The job is aware of it. What can be done to both him and the job?

The ex is supposed to have his wages garnished for child support. However they can’t because he is not working under his SS#. I found out that in 2004, 2005,2006 he was working under one of my kids SS#, 2006, 2007, 2008 he was using the other childs SS#. What can be done to him. Ive already reported it to the IRS and SS about a yr ago and nothing happened. Can the job be sued for them preventing me from getting child support money? Why isn’t he getting in trouble after a year? It is hard to do anthing- I’m in Florida with the kids and he is in NY.

Asked on May 28, 2009 under Criminal Law, Florida

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

Yes, absolutely. Most every state has some sort of dead beat dad law and enforcement process.  Not to mention what your husband did is identity theft.  So the did the job -- as a co-conspirator or accomplice.

That being said, you will need to also get yourself a private attorney to help you in sorting this mess out and fixing your kids' credit scores if any issues, credit report, etc. Try www.attorneypages.com and then check his or her record at the Florida State Bar.

 

In terms of agencies, IRS and SS are not enough. Your best bet:

1. Go back to divorce court because if there is this child support order in place, he is in contempt.  The judge may be able to help this situation.

2. Contact the district attorney's office in the county in which he works/resides.  Start there.

3. Think about wage garnishment, back tax issues, fixing the situation, etc.


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