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I was admitted to college for this semester. On their website under the tuition and fees section, the tuition rates are advertised in a way that lead one to believe the tuition rates posted apply to the whole academic school year. There is no disclaimer on this page stating that tuition rates are subject to change. Well, when I first started, the tuition rate was advertised as $100 per credit hour for out-of-state students. Now that I’m registering for my second semester, the tuition rate had been increased by $125 and I was not notified of this change. After contacting the school, they pointed me to 3 other pages on their website where there is a disclaimer regarding the fact that tuition and fees are subject to change. What I’d like to know is, am I entitled to the initial tuition rate that the University promised in advertising tuition rates for an entire year without the disclaimer?

Asked on December 14, 2016 under Business Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

No, you're not entitled to unless you had signed an actual contract or agreement locking in that rate or price. Otherwise, it is a given and fully legal that prices can increase in the future: for example, your landlord can raise your rent when your lease is up; a landscapper/lawn service can increase its price when your current contract expires; your cable and internet can go up when current contracts end; etc. So if there was no contract locking in the price for subsequent semesters, it can go up each new semester legally.


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