What to do if a doctor bills for a different reason then what I went to them for?

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What to do if a doctor bills for a different reason then what I went to them for?

Husband was referred to an urologist for low testosterone; husband discussed all symptoms, depression, tiredness, hair loss, impotence. Bloodwork came back negative and now she is billing him for impotence and didn’t even treat him for it. Our insurance does not cover any of that but it covers testosterone. His appointment was for testosterone not impotence.They won’t change codes to submit to insurance to pay for appt for testosterone. What do we do, we already tried talking to them.

Asked on April 13, 2012 under Malpractice Law, Colorado

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Rather than talk with your doctor's treating physician about the treatment recently done with respect to him where your health insurer will not pay for such, I suggest that you have a face to face meeting with the doctor concerning the charges and the issues that you have with them. Hopefully the codes will be changed based on this meeting.

Another option is to call and speak with a representative with your insurance company following up with a letter about the conversation as to how the appointment was for testosterone not impotence.

I would advise the treating physician that payment by you will not be made until the proper codes are changed by him or her.


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