Can my son sue for being shot randomly on the street and sustaining health altering changes?

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Can my son sue for being shot randomly on the street and sustaining health altering changes?

About a month ago, my son was one of 2 victims shot randomly while outside of his apartment. The incident was televised. The other victim died. My son was shot in the back and the bullet is still lodged in his hip. Also, he was shot in the leg which fractured his fibula. As a result he has no feeling in his foot on one side and the doctors say the fracture could have caused nerve damage and feeling may never come back. They also said that as he grows older, he’s 41 now, gunshot wounds tend to produce chronic pain which will persist throughout his life. It was not his fault that he was shot nor do I think they even looked for the person who did this. So my son has to suffer from a crazy person with a gun?

Asked on September 17, 2019 under Personal Injury, Maryland

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

MD has a crime victim compensation program that provides up to $25,000 in financial compensation to help victims and their loved ones cover crime-related expenses such as medical bills, lost wages, etc. Eligible victims may also be able to pursue compensation by filing a civil lawsuit. here is a link to a site that will explain further: goccp.maryland.gov/victims/cicb/
 

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Your son can sue the shooter or attacker, or anyone who helped them (for example, if it was a driveby shooting, he can sue the driver as well as the shooter). But he can only sue someone who was at fault in causing the injury; it is not clear if he was shot randomly who else might have been at fault, and so whom else he might sue.


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