Can my license be takendue toa judgement by default?

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Can my license be takendue toa judgement by default?

I just found out that I was sued 4 years ago regarding a car accident from 3 years prior. I was the only passenger out of 6 left after hours of waiting for the police and a report. That is the only way I can think of them getting my information.There were tickets that were thrown out since I was not driving. I wasn’t aware of any proceedings after that so there was a judgement by default for medical expenses in the amount of $38,000. I have talked to the state department of transportation and the opposing lawyer. They say my only option is to start paying them to regain my driving privileges. Everyone is telling me to file for bankruptcy.

Asked on September 11, 2011 under Accident Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In many states in this country if there is a resulting judgment arising out of a motor vehicle accident that does not get satisfied, certain department of motor vehicles of these states will suspend the driver's license of the person who has that judgment against him or her until it is paid in full.

This apparently is the protocol in the state of Pennsylvania.

If there was a default judgment against you for $38,000 four (4) years ago stemming from this accident, there is a small chance that you can set it aside. If you cannot pay off this judgment any time soon and your liabilities currently exceed your assets, a bankruptcy filing might be your sole option to resolve this situation.

You should consult with a bankruptcy attorney about the $38,000 judgment and your options.

Good luck.


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