Can my landlord not let the water company into get the house to turn off the water that is in our name?

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Can my landlord not let the water company into get the house to turn off the water that is in our name?

My landlord and I had an bad falling out. He’s made life difficult and has entered our apartment without notice. He’s also very threatening and living there was uncomfortable. He refuses to let the water company in to let them turn off the water that’s in my name. I just want to know my rights, as well as if he can legally do this?

Asked on July 8, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Assuming you have a written lease agreement with your landlord, its terms control in general the duties you and the landlord owe each other. You need to carefully read your lease agreement (assuming you have one with your landlord).

Even if the water utility bill is in your name for the house you are renting from him, he could possibly prevent the utility company from turning off the water for health and safety reasons since he does own the house. Additionally, water is needed for the vegetation outside the home.

The laws of most States allow a landlord to enter without notice into the unit being rented out only in an emergency situation. In all other circumstances where entry is needed by the landlord, reasonable notice must be given to the tenant. Reasonable notice typically is at least twenty-four hours.

 


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