Can I take my landlord to court if she’s trying to evict me for having dogs after she agreed that I could have them?

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Can I take my landlord to court if she’s trying to evict me for having dogs after she agreed that I could have them?

A couple of weeks after I moved in she found out I had 2 dogs. She put in writing that I could keep the dogs as long as I paid a pet deposit because they tore up the rug. A week later before Ipaid the deposit she came by and said that I couldn’t cant keep them because the guy under me complained. She always walks into my apartment while I’m at work without my knowledge or consent. She came by today wants to evict me cause of a dog. The garbage and feces aren’t my dogs. I actually tore up the carpet but she believes that it was my dogs and changed her mind and gave me 3 days to get rid of the them.

Asked on July 23, 2011 Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Read the written lease that you have with your landlord. Its terms and conditions control the duties and obligations you have as to each other. If the landlord wrote you could keep dogs in the apartment you can, subject to you not breaking any terms of your lease.

Your landlord has a tenant complaining about your dogs, which is not good for the landlord. Is your lease a month-to-month lease of a fixed term with time remaining on it? If you are under a month-to-month lease, the landlord can elect to terminate your lease with her just because she does not want you and the dogs in her property. This may be the case.

The landlord saw damaged carpet that you admit you tore up, not your dogs. I suspect that the landlord feels you are making trouble for her and that is why she wants to evict you.

Good luck.


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