Can I sue my dentist for doing bad work on a tooth?

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Can I sue my dentist for doing bad work on a tooth?

I went in for a crown that I was told I needed and following the procedure I started to endure extreme pain and could not eat, drink, sleep, breath through my mouth, etc. I went back in to the dentist and the dentist admitted that it was done poorly and it needs to be redone. However, he is telling me I have to pay a few thousand dollars extra for this, despite his poor job. I do not have that kind of money and had to go to the ER the following day due to the pain. I also saw another dentist afterwards and they told me I need to get the crown redone again.

Asked on February 12, 2014 under Malpractice Law, California

Answers:

Anne Brady / Law Office of Anne Brady

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

If the dentist who screwed up your crown is refusing to fix it for free, you may very well have case for dental malpractice.  You need to have an expert witness dentist examine you and determine that this first dentist caused your current distress.  You will also need an expert witness dentist who is willing to testify that the first dentist's screw up was not merely a slip up that could happen to anyone, but rather was a breach of the standard of care and therefore negligent.  This can be a tough row to hoe.  See a personal injury attorney and see if s/he can help you find a dentist who will fix your teeth on a lien basis and maybe agree to testify for you as an expert.


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