Can I be terminated for a co-worker telling management that my car smelled like weed?

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Can I be terminated for a co-worker telling management that my car smelled like weed?

Prior to starting my shift, a co-worker parked next to my car. While I got out off my car, she got out of her car as well. I wasn’t smoking, nor was I under the influence at the time. I share a car with my fiance and her brother, of which I’m the legal owner and driver. We commute 83 miles daily to get to work. I don’t smoke and drive; I do it in my personal time at home. She told management and they let me go for the day saying it was just a warning. They made me sign a written warning and asked me to return to work the next day, to only revive a call 3 hours later resulting in my termination. Also, the district manger prior to releasing me for the day said that he was the one that walked past my car and smelled weed which is impossible because my fiance drive the car down the street to her job, so the car wasn’t even in the parking lot at the time. Prior to this day, I have never been approached with any concern or warning regarding this matter.

Asked on March 7, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You can be fired for the reason that you were given or for any reason or or fno reason at all. That is unless this action violated company policy or the terms of a union agreement or employment contract. Also, your treatment must not have constituted some form of actionable discriination (which it does not appear to have). The fact is that most employment relationships are at will, which means that a company can set thetconditions of employment much as it sees fit or deems necessary. This includes who to fire, for what and when.


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