Can creditors hold me responsible for deceased mother’s debts

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Can creditors hold me responsible for deceased mother’s debts

My mother recently died and I would like to close her
credit accounts which were solely in her name There is no
will or any assets to pay off her remaining debts Since
one payment for June was missed several card companies are
already calling several times a day according to my caller
ID and machine at home I paid for the funeral and am
afraid that creditors may want me to pay off her cards
What is the best way to proceed

Asked on July 2, 2019 under Estate Planning, New York

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

A child does not inherit ther parent's debt (unless co-signed for it of otherwise agreed to be held responsible for repayment). Accordingly, her creditors cannot take legal action against you. Your mothers debts will extinguish as a matter of law. In other words, her creditors will eventually just charge off her debts since there are no assets from which to be paid from. At this point, just don't speak with any creditor who calls; you can ingore any messages that they leave.

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

A child does not inherit ther parent's debt (unless co-signed for it of otherwise agreed to be held responsible for repayment). Accordingly, her creditors cannot take legal action against you. Your mothers debts will extinguish as a matter of law. In other words, her creditors will eventually just charge off her debts since there are no assets from which to be paid from. At this point, just don't speak with any creditor who calls; you can ingore any messages that they leave.


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