Are the police legally liable for releasing my name and information regarding a 911 call to my employer?

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Are the police legally liable for releasing my name and information regarding a 911 call to my employer?

I teach at a small private college in FL. I had a severe panic attack, probably

caused by a reaction to medicine and a head injury I suffered a 2 days earlier, that I tried to self-medicate with alcohol. It eventually led to thoughts of self-harm. I called 911, they took me to the hospital and I was discharged the next day after meeting with a psychiatrist because it was a one-time event and I obvious wasn’t a threat to myself. It wasn’t published on the city police blotter website or in the newspaper. Even if it had it would only have shown my address, not my name. Someone with the police notified my employer, telling them it was me and I’ve been put on a leave of absence. Is this improper and are the police legally liable for the invasion of privacy, revealing the details which include medical information and it’s impact on my career?

Asked on March 4, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

No, they are not liable: there is no legitimate or protected privacy expectation in a 911 call, which is a matter of public record. Anything which is in the public record and which could be obtained by someone (e.g. on a public records request) may be disclosed without liability.


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