If afriend wants to put their liquor license in my name, what are the liabilities I would face if something happened in the bar?

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If afriend wants to put their liquor license in my name, what are the liabilities I would face if something happened in the bar?

I will not be the one running the bar, however the liquor license will be in my name. I want to know if things happen at the bar, will I get in trouble or be responsible for it? Things like fights, drugs, accidents? Is there any way that charges can be filed against me just because the license would be in my name?

Asked on August 12, 2011 Ohio

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Owning the liquor license is a completely different thing than owning the bar where the liquor license allows the serving of alcohol, be it wine, beer or hard liquor. The liquor license ownership would not get you in a difficult situation in the event of problems at the bar where a lawsuit results.

From a liability standpoint, I see greater liability to one for owning a bar with possible lawsuits resulting from automobile accidents where patrons had drank to much, serving under age patrons, injuries at the bar and the like.

Just because the liquor license is in your name, the likelihood of a lawsuit against you for that reason alone seems remote. The only caution about the liquor license being in your name would be when an under age patron is served alcohol and Alcohol Beverage Control finds out. The result is the suspension of the liquor license and fines to the owner of the establishment and the person serving the minor.


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