Would I qualify for unemployment insurane?New Jersy

I am an employee of a very large women’s retail company. I have worked there for 5 ½ years. I started as an associate and have been an assistant manager for the last 2 ½ years. Last fall a key-holder was promoted and transferred to our store. She had been with company for 1 ½ years. She let it slip to me how much she was making which is $3 an hour more then I am making. Apparently all the assistants at that store are all making that same amount. Considering how long I have been at the company and my experience I feel this is unjust. I talked with my store manager and she agreed. She brought the question of a pay raise up thru the ranks. They will not grant the raise due to pay freezes. My question is…would I qualify for unemployment insurance if a resigned now?

Asked on May 15, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, New Jersey

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

The basic requirements for collecting unemployment are:
  • You must have been employed. The New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development publishes requirements for wages earned or time worked during an established period of time referred to as a "base period."
  • You must be determined to be unemployed through no fault of your own as defined under New Jersey law.
  • You must file ongoing claims and respond to questions concerning your continued eligibility. You must report any earnings from work and any job offers or refusal of work during any claim period.
  • Meet any other unemployment eligibility requirements of New Jersey law.

Voluntary resignation to due to a pay freeze would not qualify.

 


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