What legally defines a house guest?

My friend has been living at the residence of another friend for about 7 months now. They continue to threaten to kick him out of the residence but claim that he has no legal rights in the matter. We have spoken with our local police depart and it was confirmed that he does have legal rights. I would like to know what he would actually be defined as under state law. He has had mail delivered to the residence. The property owners claim to want him to pay rent but never engage him in that conversation but expect him to know that he owes money. There are no written agreements.

Asked on July 15, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Illinois

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Under the general legal term, a "house guest" is a person temporarily staying at the home of another person on a gratuitious bases as opposed to a tenant who pays some form of "rent".

In the situation that you have written about, the "guest" after being at the premises of another for seven (7) months or so now seems like a "squatter" who needs to be served with a thirty (30) day notice to vacate by the "host".


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.