Is a landlord required to notify a tenant of a short sale?

About 2 weeks ago, we received notification of our rental house being sold at auction in about 2 months due to foreclosure. Our landlord notified us, after we contacted them about the foreclosure, that they had sold the house in a short sale. They indicated it was waiting lender approval and would be completed in 60-90 days. Which takes precedence? Is the landlord required to notify us of the short sale?

Asked on July 5, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Washington

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of all states in this country, cusotm and practice albeit not necessarily the law, a landlord should advise his or her tenants that the rental they occupy has been sold to a third party in a conventional sale or a short sale. Most importantly, the landlord seller should have tenant estoppel certificates filled out, dated and signed by the tenants to give to the buyer of the property before close of escrow.

As to a foreclosure, a landlord is not required to advise his or her tenants that the unit being rented is about to be foreclosed.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.