If my daughter was maliciously attacked last month after a soccer game and suffered physical damages and is still suffering emotional damages, what can I do?

Do I press charges against the parents or do I sue the parents for damages? At the hands of another girls she suffered a concussion and bruising on her neck after the girl grabbed my daughter by the poinytail and threw her to the ground then proceeded to then kick my daughter in the back of the head with soccer cleats on. I then rushed my daughter to the ER where she was given all sorts of tests including a CAT scan. With the final result being the concussion and neck bruising. My daughter has played soccer since she was 5 and has never been afraid and since this incident.

Asked on October 13, 2015 under Personal Injury, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Parents are not criminally liable for the acts of minor children, so you can't press charges against them. You could try to press charges against the other girl, but be aware that may be unsatisfying the juvenile justice system does not actually focus on justice but rather on rehabilitation and setting the offender on the right path. Therefore, she may face little punishment.
Parents are civilly liable for their minor's acts, so you could sue the parents. You could potentially recover your out of pocket medical including counseling costs lost wages if you missed work due to this pain and suffering for the physical effects of the concussion and possibly some amount foe the emotional trauma. It would be worth your while to consult with a personal injury attorney to discuss what your case might be worth.
 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.