Is there some way to get court findings modified or to appeal?

My wife is divorcing me. Her mother is helping her and has given her attorney 5000 as a retainer. I have been married 20 years to the same woman and we have one 14 year old son. I went to court by myself on July 11th and the court made recommendations that I can’t agree to as I will be paying my wife more than when I was living with her and I still have to support myself by paying rent and all of the other expenses. Her lawyer has sent me a document the judge asked him to create and he wants me to sign it.

Asked on July 17, 2017 under Family Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Most jurisdictions offer support and pro bono programs to divorcing parents.  With an attorney rolling over you on the other side, you need some type of representation.  So...find as many of them as you can and see if they can help you file a motion to reject or oppose the findings....or a motion for reconsideration of the court's prior rulings.
Every jurisdiction offers their programs in different ways.  Start with the local district clerk.  Call them and see what pro bono programs are offered in your jurisdiction.  Also ask for the phone number for the local bar president.  Many bar associations offer legal clinics wherein someone can give you free legal advice or representation.  Ask both the clerk and the bar association if they are aware of any other non-profit organizations in your area.  Legal Aid and Legal Services are two larger programs that often find support through United Way funding.  Some churches and local libraries offer similar programs.  The main message is to look...these programs are out there, they are just sometimes a little tricky to find.  The people that are connected to the courthouse will know how to access those programs the most quickly.


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