What to do if I contracted a plumbing service to replace a gas line in my back yard that had a gas leak but it wasn’t done properly?

The gas company had to shut off my gas until this was fixed. The plumber assured me that the job had been completed and to go ahead and schedule an appointment with the gas to company to have the service turned back on. The gas company technician inspected the work, the new gas line that had been installed had not been connected to the gas meter and the gas could not be turned on. I had already signed a contract and paid the plumber. The plumber did return to fix the problem, but my home still had no gas as a result of the plumber’s mistake. I stopped payment on the check I had written to the plumber, can I legally do this?

Asked on March 17, 2015 under Business Law, Texas

Answers:

Mark Lee / Mark R. Lee, Law Offices of

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Keep a record of the date and time of any calls you made to address the problem with the plumber.  You should send him a certified letter notifying him you stopped payment, and offer him a chance to fix the work.  You can deduct a reasonable amount for the time you do not have gas during the delay.  After a reasonable period of time, you can also hire another plumber to fix the problem, and deduct what you had to pay him.  You cannot simply refuse to pay for the work that the 1st plumber did which was not defective.  Make sure you offer to pay him for the contract value minus any money you pay to get it fixed.


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