How do you determine in which state of hire an attorney for an employment retaliation case?

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How do you determine in which state of hire an attorney for an employment retaliation case?

I live in NC and have filled a wage claim against my ex-employer in TX. In retaliation my ex-employer is trying to sue me for $18,000 in MA and I have received a notice from his attorney. It seems that he has created a fake employment agreement letter forging my signature. I want to get ready to handle: (a) case he plans to file for $18,000; (b) file a retaliation case; and (c) file case against forging my signature to establish claim for $18,000. For each of the above 3 situations in which state should I retain employment attorney?

Asked on January 24, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, North Carolina

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Why is your ex employer suing you in Massachusetts?  That through me for a loop.  If you think of things from a practical standpoint, it is better to hire an attorney whose offices are somewhat close in proximity to the courthouse in which the matter is filed against you.  Otherwise, the attorney you hire is either going to have to hire local counsel for admission to practice law in that state purposes (that will increase the legal fees) or travel to appearances (that will definitely increase the legal fees).  It is not a bad idea to have someone local take a look at the entire situation for you to evaluate the best course of action.  You have to see where witnesses are, etc. and it may be that your attorney will make a motion to move the lawsuit elsewhere as a better forum.  Good luck to you. 


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