What to do when a landlord is a lawyer?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do when a landlord is a lawyer?

I’m trying to help out a friend with an issue she has been having with her landlord who happens to also be a lawyer (albeit not a very good lawyer at all). My friend took him to court and won money that was owed to her by the landlord. He was given 30 days to pay her back. He never gave her the money. My friend told me that it’s been a few years now and she doesn’t know what to do. She can not afford a lawyer and she wants this corrupted landlord/lawyer to give her the money that is owed to her (around$3,000). What can she do?

Asked on August 20, 2012 under Real Estate Law, New York

Answers:

Mark Siegel / Law Office of Mark A. Siegel

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If your friend previously won a judgment in court, she should ask the court clerk's office how long the judgment is valid for & then if still legally valid, obtain a certified copy of the judgment previously entered by the court against the landlord. If the judgment was issued against the landlord in his name, then under NY law she can try to locate assets that are owned by the judgment-debtor (landlord), exactly as his name appears in the certified copy of the judgment, in order to satisfy the amount of the judgment. There are asset location firms who will try to locate assets owned by a judgment-debtor based upon information about you provide about the judgment-debtor & they usually charge a fee to do so. You can google search for asset locators in the area.

If assets are successfully located which are sufficient to satisfy all or part of the judgment, a judgment-creditor can contact the sheriff or marshal & provide them with a certified copy of a judgment & any other documents &/or information they require concerning the assets belonging to the judgment-debtor. The sheriff or marshal can explain the legal procedure & what paperwork & fees are required in order to have them try to legally attach or restrain assets belonging to the judgment-debtor in accordance with NY law.     


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption