What can be done about a protested check that had been paid in full, plusfees?

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What can be done about a protested check that had been paid in full, plusfees?

I bounced a $488 check to a company but made full payment plus $165 in fees (an exorbitant amount) within 30 days (the time they indicated I had to make restitution). Nonetheless, the company still protested my check. Please note that I have receipts and copies of all correspondence with that company. What can I do?

Asked on March 22, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, New York

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Not sure why the company is protesting your payment if the check went through the second time, along with the bounced check fees and processing fees. Depending on what type of company this is and if it is a large or small company, consider first emailing customer service, explaining what occurred, providing proof that payment was made and they have no reason to protest and cannot legally protest a check they have already deposited. If they stated on the check it does not represent full payment, they need to clarify and show an accounting of what they are now seeking from you. In terms of agency involvement, contact the agency that regulates this business, and if you cannot figure out which agency that would be, try your local politicians office. The politician's field representatives might be able to help steer you to the correct regulator.


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