Is it complicated to take a case to small claims court?

Small claims court is court where the amount involved is generally no more than $15,000. Most small claims courts will not require the parties to these lawsuits to have lawyers but will allow them to represent themselves. As this is the case, the trials there are conducted more informally than when lawyers are involved. The judges or magistrates who preside over small claims court will allow unrepresented parties more leeway when presenting evidence.

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Do I have to present evidence in small claims case?

Telling your story in small claims court requires proving your case in an orderly, systematic manner. To do this, you usually need witnesses and/or admissible evidence. Evidence must be presented in order to win your case, and it must be presented properly.

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What are small claims courts?

Small Claims Courts are designed to handle disputes between individuals, or an individual making a small claim against a business. Most small claims courts do not have jury trials, but are simplified proceedings heard and decided by a judge.

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When does it make sense to go to small claims court?

Small claims court is a useful and relatively inexpensive tool for resolving certain kinds of legal disputes in certain situations. Small claims courts across the United States have their own sets of rules and procedures that differentiate them from local superior courts or other legal dispute resolution venues. These rules are part of what makes small claims court so accessible, but they also limit its applicability. The following considerations can help you decide if small claims court is the best option in your particular situation.

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What types of cases do small claims courts typically hear?

Small Claims Courts frequently hear disputes such as these: the laundry loses a customer’s shirts but refuses to pay for them, or is willing to pay an amount that the customer thinks is inadequate, the landlord improperly refuses to return a tenant’s security deposit, the driver who hit a parked car won’t pay to repair the fender;

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