Should I send a letter of validation to a creditor’s attorney regarding a credit card debt?

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Should I send a letter of validation to a creditor’s attorney regarding a credit card debt?

I received a letter from a law firm that is handling a default credit card account that I fell behind on because of a reduction in my husband’s salary. The account in is in my name. I am unemployed at present. They wanted to set up payments through our bank account which I would not do. I am unable to pay the whole balance at this time but possible could make payment arrangements. Should I send letter of validation to them and what should be my next plan of action.

Asked on July 11, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Alabama

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You should send a letter to the attorney who wrote you explaining that you are unemployed, recognize the debt and are willing to work out some monthly payment plan for your obligation.

Ingoring the situation most likely will result in a lawsuit against you being filed which will cost money to defend. Since the creditor has already hired a lawyer, it does not seem that your debt will be forgotten.

Most creditors appreciate when people who owe them money make attempts to make monthly payments to resolve the debt and when attempts are made, the creditor is more likely to be reasonable in payment terms. Your next plan of action should reviewing your finances to see what you can pay the creditor monthly.

Good luck.


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