How can I get free or low cost legal assistance if I don’t qualify for legal aid?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How can I get free or low cost legal assistance if I don’t qualify for legal aid?

I cannot afford a lawyer. My husband and I separated a month ago, not my choice. He was threatening and manic (he is bipolar) I have 2 children under the age of 3. Should I be looking for a job or an apartment right now? He is planning on filing divorce in about 2 weeks (fault based, not sure how he is doing this). We already had a court date later next month for support. Also, I contacted legal aid to get assistance but since we own a house in OH they cannot help me. Should I get my name off the deed (I am not on mortgage) to get legal assistance? I don’t care about the house.

Asked on July 22, 2011 Virginia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Often, lawyers will provide help for the impovershed or disadvantage pro bono--for free--as part of their obligation to serve the community and society. You might try contacting you state and your local city bar associations--they often can refer people to attorneys will provide them free, or at least very low cost, assistance. You might also try contacting support or advocacy groups for divorced women, especially those with young children--they may have lists or resources that can help you.

As to whether you should be looking for a job or an apartment--that's less a question of what to do from a legal perspective, and more from the perspective of what is right for you. From what you write, it may make sense to try to develop you own independent resources and place to live. You may also wish to consider filing for a protective order against him, if he threatens you or the children.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption