Safe guarding my family once a prisoner gets paroled.

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Safe guarding my family once a prisoner gets paroled.

A family member testified/witnessed against someone for a double murder. That person was sentenced to life, straight time. I’m not sure what that means. Shortly after they went to prison they sent word to my family member that they’d hunt them down and **** them when they got out. It has been 20 years. The prisoner is coming up for parole soon. I want to know what I can do to protect my family from being pursued by this person once they are paroled. Please advise.

Asked on May 1, 2009 under Criminal Law, South Carolina

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Parole decisions are made after a hearing, and your family member should have a right to speak at that hearing, telling the parole board about the threat and asking them to keep this person in jail.  You can find the details at the South Carolina parole board's website:  http://www.dppps.sc.gov/victim_services_parole.html

I hope your family member reported the threat to the police when it happened.  It is very hard to prove threats of this sort, and while the police and the courts are usually sympathetic to people in your situation, they usually can't do much without hard evidence.

You should alert the police in your town to the situation, if the criminal is going to be released, and you might also want to talk to the prosecutor's office that got the conviction, especially before the parole hearing, since the prosecutor will be part of the hearing as well.  It can't hurt to have a lawyer working with you on this, and you can find one near you at http://attorneypages.com


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption