Pay laws

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Pay laws

I worked a job for a week didn t like it
so went to do something else. State of
texas. I have an employer who was
supposed to pay me in direct deposit.
During the end of the pay period nothing
came in and no mention of the reason why
direct deposit didn t hit my bank.
eventhough i gave her a direct deposit
form and she said I’ll be direct
deposited my wages so I thought maybe
next payperiod I’ll get it direct
deposit. But nothing. Two more weeks of
waiting and I never received my pay.
Contacted her several times with no
response. But she finally answered. What
happened was that she decided to turn it
into a paper check without my knowledge
and never notified me and never
responding back to my previous emails
about my pay. Its been over a month and
I asked for the check to be sent to me
through mail or direct deposited. But
she says I have to sign a release form
to get my check and that she is no
obligated to direct deposit or mail it
to me and I feel threatened to go back
there since she said security will be
present to escort me. She says i need to
schedule a time to go back and have
security watch me while I get my check .
I was working at a store for 9.50 an
hour

Asked on September 30, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You can sue her (such as in small claims court as your own attorney, or "pro se," to minimize costs) for the money. The law does NOT allow her to require a release for your final paycheck--she must pay you that money no matter what. (If she wants a release, she can offer you additional money to sign it, over and above your final paycheck.) A small claims suit is the fastest, most straightforward way to get the money.


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