Can a testimony in a parole hearing later be used against you in court?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can a testimony in a parole hearing later be used against you in court?

I am involved in a medical marijuana case were 1 person is on parole and Iam being subpoenaed to testified on his behalf. He had scales and baggies in his room. The baggies are used to take our medical marijuana to clubs to sample. If I’m in a parole hearing can anything that I say effect me either in court? Will they reopen my case to try and add other charges on my case? Should I speak with a criminal defense attorney? In Los Angeles County, CA.

Asked on August 8, 2010 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Your testimony at the parole hearing would be admissible in a subsequent proceeding (hearing). 

As to whether or not your case will be reopened and new charges added depends on whether or not it would constitute double jeopardy.  Double jeopardy means you can't be tried twice for the same offense.  However, it is not double jeopardy if your second trial would include a different offense because the new offense includes additional elements that were not part of the original charges. Additional elements would mean it is not the same offense. Even if it appears to be the same offense, it is not double jeopardy if you are tried by separate sovereignties such as being tried on federal charges and state charges.  Whether or not your case is reopened and new charges added also depends on the decision of the district attorney.

It would be advisable to speak with a criminal defense attorney.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption