My state is Indiana and my question is regarding termination.

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My state is Indiana and my question is regarding termination.

Hi, I would like to know if an employer in Indiana can terminate me for my refusing to be vaccinated against hepatitis A. I work in the deli department of a grocery store. They’re saying anyone in our department will be taken-off the schedule, if their not vaccinated by the end of August. They are not requiring all the store employees to be vaccinated, just certain departments. I am just trying to learn what my rights are. They are paying for the vaccine, if that makes a difference. Thank you.

Asked on August 15, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, Indiana

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

The federal government does not require vaccinations but many states have laws requiring health care workers to be vaccinated. IL requires employers to make available the Hepatitis B vaccine and vaccine series to all employees who have occupational exposures. As for Hep A, while I could find no specific mention of it under state statute, in an "at will" work relationship (i.e. one in which there is no employment or union agreement), a business can set the conditions of the workplace much as it sees fit.  Accordingly, you can be required to get a mandatory Hep A vaccine. That having been said, federal law may require an employer to provide a "reasonable accommodation" to an employee with religious beliefs that prevent them from taking vaccines and individuals with certain disabilities may not be able to have certain vaccinations due to the risk that they will exacerbate their medical conditions.


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