If my boyfriend is part owner of a family ranch that we lived on for 6 years, can his family keep me from moving my property?

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If my boyfriend is part owner of a family ranch that we lived on for 6 years, can his family keep me from moving my property?

My boyfriend was recently ill and his family has decided to lock up the gates to the family ranch so no one can move anything from there. If something were to happen to him what are my rights to claim my property? What do I need to prove it is my property and that I paid for the buildings and autos, etc? What do I need to ask him to do – besides marry me – to secure my rights? Part of his family hates me – his mother tried to shoot me. So I am not so sure they will allow me to move my property off the ranch. His sister has asked me to move my truck, which is on our side where we live.

Asked on November 7, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Yes, they may indeed be able to do so.  I would seek legal help in your area and bring with you all the documents and paperwork for everything over the last six years that has to do with the ranch.  And bring your boyfriend too.  Does he have a Will?  If he has an ownership interest in the ranch he needs to prepare a Will that protects you and the things you own together.  I hope that you have the receipts for things. Regardless of what happens with the ranch itself I am confident that you will be able to establish yourself as a guest to your boyfriend or a renter f some sort to be able to prove that you have the ability and the right to ave property on the ranch and that it is yours alone.  Good luck.


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