What to do if my former employer is reporting false information to companies calling for my employment refrences?

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What to do if my former employer is reporting false information to companies calling for my employment refrences?

I have already gone through a formal protest, through their channels a year ago. At that time, I recieved a letter saying that the information had been amended. I called recently, to check my own references, due to my long employment search and learned that the information is the same. No change was made. They advised me to protest it again. What is worse, is I am nearly certain that I have missed several very good oppertunities due to this. My interviews were very positive, schedules were established, and then they discontinue and give no reason. At this point, most major employers in my area have been exposed to this false information.

Asked on December 18, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Georgia

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You can sue your former employer for defamation.  Defamation is a false statement made with knowledge of its falsity communicated to a third party, who recognizes the defamatory content and the statement is injurious to your reputation.

Slander is spoken defamation.  Libel is written defamation.  Each repetition of the defamatory statement is actionable in a lawsuit for defamation.

Your damages (monetary compensation you are seeking in your lawsuit for defamation) would  include mental distress, loss of employment, and if applicable, physical illness, medical expense, loss of friends and associates.


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