My contract has expired and I wasn’t given a contract for the upcoming school year as an in-house substitute teacher but I haven’t been paid nearly what my contact states?

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My contract has expired and I wasn’t given a contract for the upcoming school year as an in-house substitute teacher but I haven’t been paid nearly what my contact states?

I wasn’t given a new contract due to budget cuts. My contract states that my salary is $25,800 with bi-weekly payments of $1075. Due to my late hire, it was prorated to $975 bi-weekly. My contract expired and I wasn’t given another solely do to budget cuts but I haven’t been paid anywhere near what my contract states. I have to pick up my final check in 3 days and I just want to know what my rights are before signing anything stating that my contract amount was satisfied. How much should my employer pay me?

Asked on May 28, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, Louisiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

You are entitled to an amount equal to an annual salary of $25,800 pro rated by how long you worked. Examples: if your contract was based on 12 months and due to your hiring date, you worked 9 months, you'd be entitled to total compensation of 9/12ths, or 3/4s, of $25,800, or $18,450. If your contract was based on 10 months (as some school contracts are) and you worked 8 of those 10 months, you'd be entitled to 8/10ths, or 4/5ths of $25,800, or $20,640. Etc.


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