What to do if my car door was hit at my place of work while I was inside the building?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if my car door was hit at my place of work while I was inside the building?

The odds of me finding who did it are slim, as there are at least 500 cars in the parking lot at a given time coming and going and in this section of the parking lot there are no security cameras. They do have some but not anywhere close to where I have to park do to the main lot being full. This is the second time my car has been damaged at work, is there anything I can do? Can I take this to small claims court for negligence? No security patrol in this parking lot either despite frequent break-ins.

Asked on March 14, 2013 under Accident Law, Kentucky

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You will have to find out whether or not your company has insurance that may provide coverage for what has happened to you. Generally speaking, unless your employer actually did something that caused the vandalism, or failed to do something like provide a safe place to park with knowledge of previous vandalism, it may be difficult to have their insurance cover your damages. You did say that there are frequent break ins.  Is your employer aware of the problem and would there be a duty on his part to do anything about it?  Those are the key questions here.  Acts of unknown third parties are typically not covered under general liability policies.   Do you have comprehensive coverage on your auto? If you do contact your insurance company, they might be able to attempt to recover your damages they paid out through a subrogation claim against your employer. Good Luck.




IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption