What can I do if the listing agent moved furniture and rented a storage unit without my permission?

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What can I do if the listing agent moved furniture and rented a storage unit without my permission?

I listed my townhouse for sale 3 months ago. There was a healthy amount of furniture that I intended to at least try and sell with the property. My real estate agent hired movers to empty the townhouse without my permission. She rented a storage unit without my permission. She stuck me with the bills for both. She also hired a carpet cleaner with an atrocious fee and house cleaners that she claims too 10 hours for 2 women to clean the townhouse to the tune of $360, and $230 for the movers, plus $81 a month for the storage. The realtor never even told me about moving the furniture, I heard from my next door neighbors who were interested in some furniture that the place had been emptied. I gave the realtor 10 days to call me and tell me what she had done and she never did I had to ask her about it and she was very sheepish, claiming that

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Asked on May 18, 2017 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You don't have to pay for the storage, moving, or other bills: no one can legally obligate you to any expense or service or cost without your consent or agreement. If you never agreed, then she has to foot these costs herself. 
You also have the right to your property or furniture back--at her expense, since she moved it without your permission. You could sue her for the value of any/all moved furniture.
Of course, interstate suits can be expensive and difficult--depending on how much money is involved, you may not think it worthwhile to do. But based on what you write, you appear to have the much better legal position in this situation.


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