What happens if a landlord forges higher income on lease application to getyou in and then you default on your lease payments?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What happens if a landlord forges higher income on lease application to getyou in and then you default on your lease payments?

In 10/06 my then fiance and myself were looking for apartments. We found one that was OKand put the application in. We were in a hurry to find a place to live, and we didn’t make enough. The landlord took our paystubs and our application and I clearly remember her changing a few numbers to get us qualified. We were young and stupid, and were in over our heads. A few months later I lost my job and we left. Now it shows up as an eviction on our record. Do I have a case to make it go away? Or and am I stuck for the next several years being denied?

Asked on December 9, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, you're stuck with it.

1) You say you saw numbers being "changed"--if you saw that and didn't act, you're complicit in what the landlord did. Once you allow the numbers to be changed (instead of it happening w/out your knowledge), you have responsibility for what is submitted.

2) Besides the above, you were able to pay for several months, and only stopped paying when you lost your job. That  means (i) if the rent was "wrong" in any way, you'd had and missed your opppportunity to complain about it and seek to either make a change or rescind the arrangment entirely--you should have acted at the outset; (ii) being evicted was tied to the job loss, not the application, since you made the payments while you were employed.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption