Is mid-level management nepotism illegal?

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Is mid-level management nepotism illegal?

My supervisor hired their spouse and charges the company for 72 hours of work

done by the spouse per week, 32 hours of which are overtime. This depletes funds from projects and shortens the available timeline to work on the projects. In addition, all of these hours are not done in the office and while difficult to

prove the hours were not actually worked, they are suspicious. My main concern is that this activity will negatively impact my company’s projects and result in

insufficient work to support my position.

Asked on February 9, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Georgia

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Does this action violate the terms of a union agreemnt or employment contract? Does it constitute some form of legally actionable discriminatation (i.e. based on race, religion, disability, age, etc.)? If not then while unprofessional, it is legal. The fact is that not all employees need be treated the same or even fairly (absent either of the above 2 situations). An employer can set the conditions of the workplace much as it sees fit. That having been said, in your particular case, you should make upper mangement aware of what what is going on with your supervisor. It is more than likely a breach of company policy and can be acted upon.


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