Is it legal to lock your roommate’s bedroom door until she pays rent that is 2 months past due?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Is it legal to lock your roommate’s bedroom door until she pays rent that is 2 months past due?

My roommate has not paid her half of our rent for this or last month. She has not had a job in 4 months. She has not received any income yet so she probably won’t pay next month’s rent either. She has been staying with her parents an hour away for the last 4 weeks. I was given permission by our landlord to put her belongings inside her room, install a deadbolt, and lock her out of her room (should she ever return for her things) until she pays her rent. The lease is also in both of our names. I want to confirm this is legal.

Asked on July 22, 2011 Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

No, it is not legal and I would not listen to your landlord.  He or she does not care really.  If you both signed the lease then you are probably both "jointly and severally liable" for the money meaning that he can come after you for all of the rent. If he is willing ask him to start an eviction proceeding against her - legally - and then once he has an eviction notice he can give it to the sheriff or Marshall to take care of.  Otherwise if you lock her out or touch her things she will have the right to sue you.  Get legal help here.  Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption