If an employee gets injured at work and there are 2 companies involved, does the employee have the right to claim from both companies?

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If an employee gets injured at work and there are 2 companies involved, does the employee have the right to claim from both companies?

A 21 year old girl working as the manager of a fast food restaurant.slipped at work due to the leakage of water from 1 of the soda machines. Despite making complain to the soda company about the water leakage, no one came to fix the machine. Even after making complaints to the restaurant about the leakage no one from there helped. Does the employee have the right to claim compensation from both the fast food chain and the soda company due to their

negligence? The girl’s back and knee were injured in the accident.

Asked on April 16, 2016 under Personal Injury, Alaska

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

If there are two companies potentially at fault, she could try to get compensation from either or both, but that does not let her get double compensation. Regardless of how many people or business may be at fault, an injured person is entitled only to the same total amount of compensation (more people to sue just increases the odds of getting something). What she is potentially entitled to is the sum or total of:
* out-of-pocket (not paid by insurance or Medicaid/Care) medical bills;
* lost wages, if any;
* other direct out-of-pocket costs (e.g. if she had to buy a back and knee brace; cab rides to doctor or hospital)
* for injuries causeing serious, long lasting (typically, months or longer) disability or significant ife impairment, some amount for "pain and suffering"


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