What can I do if I worked for an insurance firm for several months as a supervising agent and was required to interview candidates/train new employees and fire bad ones, all without pay, in addition to my duties as a representative?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What can I do if I worked for an insurance firm for several months as a supervising agent and was required to interview candidates/train new employees and fire bad ones, all without pay, in addition to my duties as a representative?

Now, almost 2 months after I left the firm, I received a bill for about $400 in overpaid prepaid advances, as though I somehow owe this firm what little money I did make. Is there any recourse for the unworked labor or for the $400 invoice I received? I know as an independent contractor this is all or mostly legal but this entire situation is unethical and I don’t know how anyone should be able to get away with this.

Asked on September 29, 2015 under Employment Labor Law, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

An employer can have employees take on additional responsibilities or work without any additional compensation. If you were an independent contractor, you could in theory have refused to do the work though they then likely could have terminated employing you, but once you agreed to do the work without additional pay, you cannot after the fact seek additional compensation--the time to have bargained for more money, if you were a contractor, was upfront, before doing the work.
If you were paid advances vs. commissions, but did not fully earn out the advance, they can seek reimbursement of the unearned funds and even sue you for the money, if necessary.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption