Is it legal for a firm to ask for someones weight, height and BMI in order for the employee to get a health benefit?

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Is it legal for a firm to ask for someones weight, height and BMI in order for the employee to get a health benefit?

I work for a finance firm and this year they are implementing a health assessment where they asking for weight, height, BMI (body mass index), blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose. In the past we were given money for our HSA account and now we have to pass 3 of the 5 mentioned categories in order to receive this benefit. We were also told that it will keep costs down but we already have a high deductible plan which equates to having no insurance until you reach it.

Asked on April 2, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If the firm that you work for has a certain requirement to obtain certain health benefits where weight, height and body mass index need to be given for such benefits, there must be some legitimate reason for such information. For example, premiums for the health plan of the various individuals. The information in and of itself requested does not seem improper.

I suggest that you sit down with your human resources department to have your question better explained in that it seems to be more of an internal question within your company and with your company's health insurer.


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