Can an harassment injunction overturned by appeal, be appealed?

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Can an harassment injunction overturned by appeal, be appealed?

I filed for an harassment restraining order and was granted a 2-year injunction. The respondent has filed an appeal but I received the court order with such short notice that I haven’t been able to get the information that I need for the new date. If the original finding is overturned and the injunction lifted, will I as the plaintiff, be allowed to appeal the result of the appeal by the respondent?

Asked on February 21, 2011 under Personal Injury, Wisconsin

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

This is a "procedural" question rather than a legal question and it is best asked to an attorney in your state who is familiar with the procedural law.  Now, generally speaking you can continue to "appeal" decisions throughout your state system and then to the Supreme Court of the United States, should they grant a hearing on the matter.  There are instances, though, where certain types of matters can not be appealed, but that generally deals with mediation and arbitration issues and the parties agree to the limitations contractually before hand.  That is not really what applies here.  You can call your local bar association and ask about a consultation with an attorney there (sometimes they are free or at a reduced rate).  Good luck. 


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