If I rent a home from my parentsbut my stepfather doesn’t give me sole possessory rights, what are my options?

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If I rent a home from my parentsbut my stepfather doesn’t give me sole possessory rights, what are my options?

He feels that he can stay with us any time he wants too, for as long as he wants too and that I still pay full rent and all utilities. We have no written rental agreement just a verbal agreement. We agreed to rent amount and that I would assume all utilities and keep the house in neat order. I am not behind on my rent or my utilities; the  house is immaculate. My stepfather also allows other family members to store personal items in the garage (i.e. a car) which prevents me from using the garage for my own vehicle. If something were to happen to these items, like burglary/theft or fire, who is responsible for their property?

Asked on February 28, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you have an oral agreement with your stepfather where you do not have sole possessory rights for the rental and want it, you need to have a written agreement signed by your landlord to that effect. Until you receive a written lease signed by your landlord giving you sole possessory rights to the unit, other family members can store items in the garage and your stepfather can come over to stay at the unit from time to time.

If the items stored in the garage are damaged belonging to other family members, the person who damaged the items is responsible for the costs of repairs or replacement.


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