What can I do if I missed court and have a bench warrant out for my arrest?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What can I do if I missed court and have a bench warrant out for my arrest?

The charge is a misdemeanor domestic assault and my only charge. I’m going to contact my PO in the morning and turn myself in. Any advice on how to handle or approach this to make it as easy on myself as possible?

Asked on April 14, 2014 under Criminal Law, Tennessee

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

You're on the right track.  The longer you avoid a warrant, the more it looks like you are avoiding your obligations under the law.  It you turn yourself in, it keeps the door open to the defense that "hey-- I just forgot or I mis-calendared the court date."  Judges don't like it when defendant's miss court, but they are more cordial when defendant show back up to take care of things.  When you do turn yourself in, see if they will reinstate your bond or give you a lower bond on the basis that they didn't have to bring you in involuntarily.  If you have concerned about the bond, try to hire an attorney to help you with the bond issue (if nothing else).  If you had a fine that was due with any of your obligations, it also helps to bring your fine money with you-- to show that not only are you reappearing, but you are appearing prepared to take care of your obligations.  If there was something else that you were supposed to do-- try to come prepared to complete or have completed that task as well.  That shows the judge and your probation officer that you are truly trying to do what is asked of you.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption