If I was the manager of a business and signed for accounts on behalf of the owner, whatcan Ido if I’m now being sued personally for them?

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If I was the manager of a business and signed for accounts on behalf of the owner, whatcan Ido if I’m now being sued personally for them?

I managed a tire business that was owned by my boss. In good faith I signed on accounts for him and helped him profit in his business. His business went under and he owes a company $7200 for an account I signed for in good faith on his behalf; now they are after me for the money. My old boss has said he would “take care of it, and I would not pay a penny”, but he has not followed through and they are still after me. This was never my debt; the debt belonged to the business that he owned.

Asked on July 11, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Colorado

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

First, were the accounts you signed for you boss for the tire business or for your boss individually? When you signed on those accounts, did you sign on behalf ofthe business or individually, not as an employee for the business?

Potentially, you may be liable for the obligation under the account if you signed individually and not as an employee if you have an ownership interest in the business. If you were solely an employee of the business and did not sign the account on behalf of the company, most likely you will not be held responsible in the end for the account's unpaid amount.

You need to press your former boss to make payments to keep the creditors who are bothering you off your back. Potentially you can speak to the labor department in your State about the situation if your former boss continues to ignore your requests to resolve the situation.


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