What to do if I just had surgery to remove an infection due to a stictch that was never removed from a surgery that I had last year?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if I just had surgery to remove an infection due to a stictch that was never removed from a surgery that I had last year?

The doctor that just did this surgery discovered a stitch that was left in me which caused the infection. I’ve been through hell the past 7 months – pain, being terrified, nurses, doctors, depression that got worse because of it. I want to sue because I could have died; I am not even sure the infection is gone yet 9which means more doctor’s visits and monitoring. I hsve anxiety that you cannot imagine over the idea that I’ll be back in the hospital before long. I cant take it. What should I do first?

Asked on April 4, 2013 under Malpractice Law, New Jersey

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Speak in person with a medical malpractice attorney--many provide a free or low-cost initial consultation (you can ask about this  on the phone, before making the appointment). From what you write, this may be a case of malpractice, if the physician who removed the stitches from the prior surgery was supposed to have removed this one as well, but failed to do so (e.g. was careless). However, beside whether or not this constituted malpractice, another critical question is what might your case be worth--since malpractice cases can be among the most expensive cases to bring, it's only worth pursuing one if the potential recovery justifies it. Experienced malpractice counsel can advise you as to both the strength and potential worth of you case.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption