What to do if I got a letter from the DEAthat they had a wiretap for someone’s cell and my communications with them may have been recorded.

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What to do if I got a letter from the DEAthat they had a wiretap for someone’s cell and my communications with them may have been recorded.

Will this affect me? The letter stated DEA had a wiretap order for 2 phone lines and my communications may have been intercepted. Why are they sending me this letter? And, does this mean I am in any legal trouble? I know the people that the cell pones belong to were arrested recently on drugtrafficking charges but I have had no contact with either of them for probably 3 months. Is this just a notification or am I caught up in their net somehow?

Asked on April 2, 2012 under Criminal Law, Florida

Answers:

Richard Southard / Law Office of Richard Southard

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

It can be either.  They might be trying to rattle some cages to see if this will further some new phone activity. They may be seeking your cooperation in the future and trying to scare you into helping.  You may be a new target in their investigation.  There a re a number of possibilities.  You should speak with an experienced criminal lawyer in a confidential setting to discuss any potential criminal liability on your part.  Understand that in the federal criminal system, very litlle involvement can lead to conspiracy charges with drastic conseuences.  You should not be speaking to any Agents or investigators without an attorney present.

Kevin Bessant / Law Office of Kevin Bessant & Associates

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

At this point this appears to just be a routine notification of the governments surveillance of your phone lines. Keep in mind that sometimes the Government can subpoena you to testify at trial against the defendants based upon the nature of the those phone conversations, but if they intend to do so, you will be notified of that as well.


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