What can I do if my boss is having an affair with a co-worker and has asked me to li for him about it?

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What can I do if my boss is having an affair with a co-worker and has asked me to li for him about it?

I am the manager of a franchise store that is partially owned by my boss, his wife, and his father-in-law. I recently found out that my boss and co-worker are having an affair. I am concerned for several reasons, first the co-worker and my boss have implied that I must lie for them, since other employees have been suspicious. Second, I’ve been asked to change locations so that my boss can be closer to the employee with whom he is having the affair (he’s now staying in an apartment with her when he is in town, since he owns several stores in different cities). Last, I am worried about my job since his wife and father-in-law are partial owners as well. Is it possible that she could take everything if it were to come out?

Asked on September 1, 2014 under Employment Labor Law, North Carolina

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

What you should do is look for another job: you have no protections against being put in compromising positions (as you already have been), against being fired, transferred, etc. (unless you have a written employment contract), and the situation is highly volitile and unstable. Your boss can ask you lie for him, and fire you unless you do--or fire you anyway; the wife or father-in-law can presumably fire you, if they are part-owners, and your role in lying, etc. comes out; the company could fold or be destroyed by family fighting; and you could be dragged into a divorce, etc. as a witness.


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