How do I switch the custody from my motherand father to my grandmother?

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How do I switch the custody from my motherand father to my grandmother?

I am 18 years old and I believe that my parents try to hold me back from going to college purposely. I have been out of school a year and a half now, and on their behalf, I haven’t furthered my education. I try to go to college on my own, but you always need a parent or guardian to sign something if you are under the age of 24. I want to change my guardianship from my mother and father to my grandmother. I would be living with her then, as well as attending college. I’m not sure how to go about this.

Asked on September 1, 2011 under Family Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You should speak to a family law attorney about your situation to be sure, but I believe that this is not the proper solution for your situation: at the age of 18, you are a legal adult and no one has "guardianship" of you unless you are incompetent (e.g. significantly developmentally challenged or with a serious mental illness). Indeed, if someone were your "guardian" once you are 18, that would be to take away your own power to contract, etc., and give it to your guardian. People can go to college, rent apartments, buy property, etc. once they turn 18 without any signature by a parent or guarndian, so it should not present any difficulty. Again, it's best to speak with an attorney in detail about your specific situation to be sure, but you may need to simply explain when applying somewhere or for something that your parents are not involved in your life.


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